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10 classic Abarths brimming with Italian style, performance, and heritage


#1

Racing was in Carlo Abarth’s blood. In 1933, the 25-year-old engineer designed a sidecar in which he beat the Orient Express train in an epic, 800-mile race from Vienna, Austria, to Ostend, Belgium. That was only the beginning.


This is a companion discussion topic for the original entry at https://www.hagerty.com/articles-videos/articles/2019/03/11/10-best-abarths-from-geneva

#2

How about the 750 Double Bubble Zagato. To me that is the flag ship model. I have both it and a 695.

                                     …………………..Jim.

#3

people here actually paid money for these things?

they and Alfa Romeo were about the only products of worse quality than those of British Leyland;

used to have to park my E-type literally on top of a hill, disconnect and bring the battery inside, work or home;

starting it was not unlike a Sopwith Camel and forget about stopping it in gear with its stump-pulling torque from 500 rpm onward;

one basically had two or three chances to get it running before the plugs went swimming and the battery went flat as a bad boxer;

even still, that was a significant cut above comedic errors like Abarth and Alfa Romeo;


#4

Thank you Ronan Glon.
Abarth, Gordini, Cooper and Shelby all share the same passion and idea of taking a sedate car and turning it into a “raging bomba”. I am fortunate to own a 1968 595 SS and a 1000TC Berlina Corsa vintage racer. If you happen to visit Naples, Florida, I strongly recommend the Collier Collection (Revs Institute). Miles Collier is an Abarth fan and owns a rare Abarth Simca 2 Mila, an even rarer Porsche Abarth, and the 1969 ex-Al Cosentino championship 1000TCR, a true raging bomba. Seen here racing against my 1000TC at Lime Rock.
https://www.youtube.com/edit?ar=2&o=U&video_id=bA8BfVaAo84
Forza Abarth, for its 70th birthday! And boo on FCA for not celebrating this milestone… “An entity that doesn’t celebrate its past has no future.” Alain