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64 1/2 Mustang Coupe - RestoMod idea JDM motor


#22

I am a purist, keeping the brands powering the brands- Ford in a Ford for example. It’s your car, you can do whatever you want, that’s the beauty of our hobby.

If you are doing it for fun but still knowing at some point you will sell it, you want to keep the car open to as many buyers as possible. The Toyota drive train will greatly limit the buyers- no matter what the HP.


#23

that will be my wifes problem, as I don’t sell anything…My son is hoping she forgets about them and he will take them all. But you are correct, it would limit the market severely. I am not usually mixing things up so much, but I came by this car in a strange circumstance many years ago. My hobby is road racing and the cars that do that well, this was a buddy of my dads in a nasty divorce and I was helping him out by buying it, but that was like 1989 or 90. It has been taking up space for a long time and I am finally ready to do something with it.


#24

Do what you want. It’s your car.Everyone likes to see a car with a difference.
My idea is taking a 69 Camaro and putting in a AMC V-8 Just to blow people’s minds,LOL!


#25

My first thought is, it’s your car do what you want. But, you asked for opinions so here’s mine. I’m an American car guy. I would never put a Toyota (or any other foreign engine) in a Ford. If you want to build a 1000 hp Toyota start with a Toyota. Just my opinion because you asked.


#26

In the mid 70’s I worked at a Datsun dealer and some of the mechanics played around with a 240Z 6 cylinder in a Mustang with the factory 5 speed. It was pretty nifty and handled well. The flip side was a Datsun 2000 roadster with a 289 and C4 automatic. That was like driving an ice-cube. Unless there is pure value in the Mustang when correctly restored, go for it.


#27

My neighbor has a 66 coupe with the 460 from my old F250 in it. It is on a full frame however and theirs plenty of engine bay room due to that.


#28

Huuum, not sure your '64 chassis can take that much of power ! Much work to be done on suspension, brakes etc. Worth it ?


#29

You asked for thoughts which I appreciate you doing first. My thought is this idea is sick. Why don’t you find a Japanese car to do this to instead of ruining a classic American car? There must be plenty of mid 70s Celicas that stole their styling from the 69-70 Mustang Fastback including the basic design of the tail lights. If the Mustang is as you say, it is worth more than average but you will destroy the value doing this. You could probably sell your Mustang and get enough to pay for the whole build including the Celica. You would avoid a whole lot of controversy doing that.


#30

this is great, thanks for all your thoughts…exactly what I was hoping to hear - what others are thinking and for free ! We all know there is only cost to this hobby, rarely profit, so the value is the fun and how the cars make you feel while enjoying them. This car redone stock would look great, but that’s it, it would drive horribly as a performance car. The right fab work to stiffen and prepare for lots of power will be done and because it will have that tatty racecar vibe the stripped out interior will be much less money and time. Anyway again i do appreciate the feedback, it is great to hear from so many - the hobby is certainly big enough for everybody’s perspective. cant wait to get this started…


#31

I think you’ll find a few people interested, especially if the work done is impressive. You find some who will recognize it’s your car and you’re free to do what you want. Most will vomit in their own mouths. Personally I’m not no fan of the idea. There are few things I loathe more than seeing a Chevy 350 in a Ford or Plymouth. A Toyota motor in a Mustang…I’m too much of an Automobile Xenophobic.


#32

First off, the claim that your 260 will never make 200 hp is erroneous. The same power adders that the Supra needs to make that kind of hp will do the same for a small block ford. You could always use a 289 crank, forged pistons, some afr heads, a performer rpm manifold, a streetable hydraulic roller cam, the Shelby style centrifugal supercharger, and you will putting a LOT more than 200 hp down. Actually if you did all of the above and kept the 260 crank, and went with an aftermarket head with no more than 165-170 port volume (w/a naturally aspirated mill), you would STILL be way beyond 200 hp. Use some full length tri y headers and you would have a fun streetable car without having to go “boy racer/rice boy” with the power plant. Ford managed 271 hp from their hottest street 289 and Shelby managed 305 hp with a better intake, hotter cam, bigger four barrel. All the of this with the FACTORY 289 heads. The only difference between hipo and non hipo 289 heads is screw in studs and guideplates. Also keep in mind that the 8” rear end while good, will become a grenade with a mill like you want. It’s your car. Do what you want, But if you decide to sacreligiously put a Toyota mill in it, then I will happily pay for the shipping on that 260, build a stroker mill out of it and put it in my ‘68 Cougar when the 289 dies (Dyno proven 325 hp naturally aspirated don’t tell me you can’t get 200 out of 39 fewer cubes).

I’d just as soon be shot in the face with a fart cannon than put a Toyota engine in a classic pony car.


#33

I am a believer in pure restorations…my neighbor is a straight out hotrod guy…we both enjoy our toys the way we each want to and both appreciate what the other one does…it is your car, have fun with it as it best fits your needs


#34

It’s your car, do as you please… but IMO the car should have a theme. If the theme is “what I had in the garage to make it run and drive” that’s pretty cool. But (again IMO) a mash-up of various stuff without something to tie it together would be kinda lame no matter who the targeted audience is.