Hagerty.com

DIY: How to check and change engine oil


#1

In this episode of Hagerty DIY, Randy walks us through the process of checking and changing engine oil in Hagerty’s 1965 Ford Mustang.


This is a companion discussion topic for the original entry at https://www.hagerty.com/articles-videos/articles/2018/02/16/how-to-check-and-change-engine-oil

#2

Most car owners that are engaged in taking care of their car engine oil change in regularly, as recommended by the manufacturer. Simple, cheap, and easy to do. Also always select a quality oil filter. Name Brand oil filters can be deceiving.

Avoid oil changing services. They typically use the cheapest oil filter available and mangel the drain plug and over tighten the plug because they can. Your loss. Get under and get it done right.


#3

@hbbaywater - I agree, there is a lot of reasons to do oil changes yourself. There is also a few hassles associated with fluid changes at home. Containing and storing used fluids can be a pain.

For that reason I change the oil for my classics at home, but the regular use cars go to an a oil change shop where I know their name and they know mine.


#4

Very nicely done video. With regard to refilling through a funnel, it’s good to leave a gap around the funnel stem for air. If the funnel completely plugs the hole, you’re likely to get oil splashing back up - not fun.


#5

This is the 1st Hagerty video I’ve watched in some time that truly disappointed me. I found it hard to believe that the technician had a notable amount of oil draining out from the oil pan then proceeded to install the plug. I also believe he said “that’s good enough”. I don’t think that rushing the drain is a good practise.Where possible I’ve always believed that when there’s a spin on oil filter (mounted vertically or almost) it should be filled as much as possible to ‘minimize’ a dry start. I’ve always made the effort to fill my K&N filter as full as practical before installing. Am I nit picking or does anyone out there feel that this instructional video could have been done a whole heck of a lot better??


#6

I have been in the automotive field for almost 60 years and I couldn’t find anything wrong with how Randy did the oil change, I’m not going into my qualifications as I would be typing all day.

You could let the oil drip out for another fifteen minutes, but you wouldn’t get another two tablespoonfuls.
As far as pre-filling the filter, that is a good idea except the one Randy had, he couldn’t have gotten a quarter of a quart of oil in that filter.

The engine doesn’t run dry on an oil change as there is plenty of oil in the passages, oil pump and bearings to run that engine without damage until the oil pressure is reached, the trick is to pre-run the engine to get the oil everywhere then shut off the engine and drain, it’s those engines that have been sitting all night or draining the oil for an extended period that might have a problem.

I do disagree on the intervals between oil changes, the newer engines have much tighter tolerances and closed systems, you could wait a year, but the older engines require more frequent oil changes regardless of the mileage.
Because of, lets call it not very efficient tolerances, there are more contaminants induced into the oil and even with the engine not running everyday or for not very long, those contaminants, mostly water, produce sludge.
So I would say change your oil every four months even though you don’t have the mileage on it.

I hope this will add to a very good Video on oil changes.


#7

I have been changing oil on my cars since 1970. I differ with Randy in that after I fill the crankcase and then start the engine that’s when I check for leaks under the car while the engine is running. That way the oil is under pressure and flowing through all the engine passages and leaks are, in my opinion, more evident and easier to spot. I also could swear that those small block V8 Fords held 5 quarts of oil and not four.


#8

That’s correct, when you have removed a filter and a drain plug that is when you may get a leak, if you had one prior to the oil change you would have seen it on the floor of your garage.
You are just making sure you got them back on properly.
Actually what Randy was looking for had nothing really to do with an oil change, I guess while he was under there he would check other things, which is good.
They do hold five, he just didn’t want to overfill it before he got the filter full, after that he would top it off, he didn’t explain that very well.

underwriterssurvey
February 22 |

I have been changing oil on my cars since 1970. I differ with Randy in that after I fill the crankcase and then start the engine that’s when I check for leaks under the car while the engine is running. That way the oil is under pressure and flowing through all the engine passages and leaks are, in my opinion, more evident and easier to spot. I also could swear that those small block V8 Fords held 5 quarts of oil and not four. Visit Topic or reply to this email to respond.
In Reply To

gooden5886
February 22 |

I have been in the automotive field for almost 60 years and I couldn’t find anything wrong with how Randy did the oil change, I’m not going into my qualifications as I would be typing all day. You could let the oil drip out for another fifteen minutes, but you wouldn’t get another two tablespoonful… Visit Topic or reply to this email to respond. To unsubscribe from these emails, click here.


#9

I am fairly new to this “car business”, so I am wondering why no info ( that I could find) re: OIL ADDITIVES…good, bad, or indifferent? Are there any good ones? Is there any reason to consider them at all? Thanks! KOB


#10

@kbartlow1 - You ask a good question about oil additives. It’s a tricky one too. Talk to 10 car people and you will likely get 10 different answers.

The key to additives is to really research whatever it is that you want to put into your engine, which means by the time you are done you’ll also be partway to a chemical engineering degree. Additives are not regulated nor tested by anyone so marketing claims largely don’t get verified other than users sharing their experience which causes it’s own set of problems with no two situations being the same.

Also, modern oils already have many additives in their chemical makeup. Anything else you are putting in is a supplement to those and at times there can be too much of a good thing.