Hagerty.com

Hell yeah to the Hellephant, Mopar’s 1000-hp Hemi crate engine


#1

They got us. We were sure that Mopar was hinting at the return of a big-block-based Hemi crate engine. Instead, it took the Gen III Hemi V-8 to 426 cubic inches and is offering it up as the Hellephant, a 1000-horsepower mammoth of a motor that also churns out 950-lb-ft of torque and is ready to drop into your classic Mopar street muscle car or drag racer.


This is a companion discussion topic for the original entry at https://www.hagerty.com/articles-videos/articles/2018/10/30/hell-yeah-to-the-hellephant-mopars-1000-hp-hemi

#2

Someone needs to correct the text in the headline for this article that showed up in my inbox, it says the engine is twin turbo, when it is actually supercharged.


#3

Yes, you’re correct. That’s an error on our part—apologies—which only appeared in the newsletter. Thanks for pointing it out!


#4

I’m a big MoPar fan, been that way for years, and I love horse power. Hey, CUBIC INCHES spoken here. Metric is UNAMERICAN! Anyway, I’m digging this Supercharged “Hellephant” just as much as anyone else might, but. To what extent do we need to stuff that much motor under our hoods? In other words, why? Unless you the type of person the has millions of dollars at you disposal and you just want to take it to the drag strips all over the country for bragging rights, I see this as a pointless extravagance. It’s totally impractical to own one for the road car as you’d never be able to really use it that much. Okay, now let’s hear it from the naysayers that I’m wrong. I expect as much.


#5

Sorry, that should read, “THAT has millions of dollars at YOUR disposal.”


#6

“WOW-SAH!!!” I’m betting this “Hellephant” Crate engine is “Huge” money, and no doubt comes w/“Zero” warranty!
I’ll stick w/my 2009 Corvette Callaway w/18,850 miles, black/dark gray 6-speed automatic.


#7

Interesting factoid- All US measurements are actually defined by metric standards. So in effect, the US system is based on the metric system; you just have to convert everything into inches, ounces etc.


#8

Someone help me out. No matter how I crunch the numbers I don’t get 426 CI…
Using 3.14158 for PI it goes as follows.
PI R sq= 2x2x3.14159=12.566636x4.125=51.836235x8cyl=414.686988 cu in.
I know I’m getting long in the tooth but I don’t think senility has set in.
Jim
???
Jim


#9

I’d say Mopar is probably rounding up to make it easier to publicize. They’re using math when convenient my friends…


#10

Sounds more like creative marketing. My philosophy has always been "The only thing that beats cubic inches is cubic feet.

Jim


#11

I have an original 426 Hemi 4speed in my 70 roadrunner numbers matching. I have to say the new Hemi is a definite force to be reconed with, but my 70 has put the fear in many SRT and Hellcats. When they pull up next to me and rev there engines it may be discomforting to my ears but when I rev my engine the ground shakes


#12

If they ever bring this body style back, I’ll buy it. First car, '68 Charger. Miss it.


#13

I agree with you. I think 500hp is overkill for the street. I believe the old Ford 428 SCJ only had like 280 modern hp. The new ford 2.3 L turbo ha as much power as the old 60’s Big Blocks.

Anyway this much power on the street is silly to say the least, in fact floor it and 1 second later you are barely in control.

I am loooking for a 78-81 Trans AM or Z-28 and i am seriously considering scrapping the V-8s and putting in a 275 hp GM turbo 4 w/ a 6 speed manual. that and good brakes is all they would need to be safe at trple digit speeds and get 25 mpg when drining the speed limit. and with crappy 87 octane gas they just retard timing & boost automaticly so you lose a few HP when commuting.


#14

“but when I rev my engine the ground shakes!” Motox, I love it. Wish I could see there faces when they hear your response.


#15

ednamaeknot, Dodge almost did back in '99, at least I think so, with this concept design.

image

Unfortunately, we got this clunky looking thing instead.

image

I agree with you. The '68-'70 iconic body design under Elwood Engel’s management in the Dodge division is what we MoPar fans all look for. I guess legends only come around once in each of our life time.


#16

Jay, thanks for taking notice of my quips, I thought it would more or less fall on deaf ears. Iain53 did mention that metric system is commonly used here in the U.S. My comment about, “cubic inches spoken here!” was more of a fun thing which I hope we all get.

Anyway, I hope you find your project and get to do the things you mentioned. I would like to find a '73-'74 Charger that still runs, and won’t cost me my life’s savings, and do a “Mad Max” thing with it. If only I could.


#17

@jsfury - That was sad to see the massive changes between concept and production. I feel like Dodge has gotten better about leading with something radical and producing something bland, but only time will tell. It’s certainly time for the Charger to get a major refresh.


#18

Indeed Kyle, well said sir. Well said. Dodge division does need to redo Charger, and definately look at the second generation platform of the Engel years, '68-'70, Look at the recent SEMA shows over the last couple years. Look at what’s been done to those cars. Pretty damn impressive I’d say. So com’on Dodge, what’s the hold up?


#19

I have driven a late model Charger. It was faster than my '68. More reliable, creature comforts and all. My frustration with the later Charger is it has too many doors, looks nothing like the old ones, and it is a family car. Apparently, many people like this as is their prerogative. The Ford GT, Mustang, Challenger and Camaro are retro designs that tried to capture the “glory”, if you will, of what captured the imaginations of our youth. For me, the Charger misses on all cylinders. It is a very fast family car. It is a good car, but it really does not represent why Dodge made them in the first place. I realize that people’s idea of what is cool has changed over the decades, and auto makers look for what will sell, and apparently this is the result of the research. Perhaps someday Dodge will revisit the old design and come up with something that more represents what the Charger was, but with an eye to the future.


#20

ednamaeknot,

I am most sure the late model “whatever” have the most creature comforts a person could want. and yes, our vehicles today are much faster then our old iron was, but… you mention style, and here is where I personally believe American, and some foreign auto manufacturers fall rather short of the objective.

You look at Challenger, Mustang, Camaro and their “retro” two door design. It’s very popular, and from what I can tell is doing well in sales, I think. But these are all ‘pony’ cars, and not the bigger wheel base sedans. That’s what Charger, Road Runner, GTO, Malibu, GSX, 442 were all about, and now all, but a few, GONE! Why? No interest from the younger generation. How very sad.

As for reliability, yes they certainly are that, until the electric gremlin gets loss! Then you’re screwed! The older the fly-by-wire cars get, the more headaches you will have. Believe me, I know. That’s why I will stick with my old “unreliable” cars, because truth be told, I can still fix them.