Hagerty.com

Right car, right price: Living (and buying) by the $10,000 Rule


#1

It was the summer of 1991, and Dean Caccavo was washing his 1988 Toyota Supra in his Agoura Hills, California, driveway. A thought suddenly occurred to him: he didn’t like this car very much. Worse still, he’d gone into debt to buy it, borrowing a third of the car’s $15,000 purchase price, and through the evil magic of depreciation the car had only declined in value during his ownership.


This is a companion discussion topic for the original entry at https://www.hagerty.com/articles-videos/articles/2017/11/02/right-car-right-price

#2

Awesome article! This summer I bought a '69 MGB GT for $2,700. It runs, drives, and stops well. Prior to discovering the listing on Craigslist, I never considered pulling anything in the driveway that didn’t come from the Big 3. The car looked like it spent its life out west, it was the unique “GT”, and I still had student loans to pay, so it seemed logical make the purchase. So far it’s produced nothing but great memories and expanded my mechanical horizons.


#3

Surprised to hear this - always been my practice. Get a good used car for under 10K, and put parts/labor in as needed - far cheaper than buying new. On buying my 1941 Plymouth, though, I followed a $4K rule; bought a 4-door, a non-Ford non-GM, that had been treated like a commuting car prior to my purchase - not restored, but someone kept it running enough to get to work and back. I’d love to spend $4K on a new interior, but instead will measure and hit the sewing machine. Of course, a pre-war Plymouth is a strong reliable two tons of steel; much parts interchangeability, when Mopar still was the leader in engineering - before they embraced planned obsolesnce in the mid 1950’s (the 55 and 56 are lovely, but rust MUCH easier than the pre-war). I know most folks like high dollar, super restorations, but not my preference.


#4


This is my 1968 Kaiser Jeep 5/4 ton M715. Have had it for 10 years now. I drove these types of trucks when I was in the Army during the Vietnam War. Brings back an awful lot of memories. It is totally original, except for larger military tires on it. Under the hood is the 230ci Tornado motor. Straight 6 and gas fed. 4 speed with a high/low transfer case. It’s a labor of love. She runs excellent about 90% of the time. Biggest issue is the coil. They fail about every two years. Always have a spare!
Purchase price 10 years ago was $7,000. Been offered way north of that many times. She’s always a hit at the local cruise nights and parades. The pride of owning it and the thrill of driving it are priceless. Hope to own it for many years to come.


#5

@militarypotts - I always liked that body style and cringe a bit when I see them turned into offroad rigs.

Did you do any restoration work on it?


#6

No restoration body wise Kyle. Alway seem to be working on it mechanically though. Did put on the much larger tires. This truck actually came home from Vietnam in 68 Dec. Back to Fort Sill Oklahoma. A young man from Whitewater Wisconsin bought it at an auction of old military vehicles. I live in northern Illinois and went and picked it up. It was literally parked in a barn. I agree with you 100% about turning these pieces of military history into rock crawlers or off-road vehicles.The top of the hood was slightly damaged while in-country, but it gives the truck character as far as I’m concerned. This truck is the real deal.

Kyle
November 8 |

@militarypotts - I always liked that body style and cringe a bit when I see them turned into offroad rigs.

Did you do any restoration work on it?

Visit Topic or reply to this email to respond.

In Reply To

militarypotts
November 8 |

[KaiserJeep] This is my 1968 Kaiser Jeep 5/4 ton M715. Have had it for 10 years now. I drove these types of trucks when I was in the Army during the Vietnam War. Brings back an awful lot of memories. It is totally original, except for larger military tires on it. Under the hood is the 230ci Tornad…
Visit Topic or reply to this email to respond.

To unsubscribe from these emails, click here.


#7

When I was an apprentice at Ford (England) in 1969, they sent me to a Technical College in Rugby to take my Degree. As part of the course, we students were treated to an outing to the research facility at MIRA (Motor Industries Research Association) in Atherstone, Warwickshire. One of the exhibits was their off-road capability course, and they gave rides around it in a variety of vehicles. My mate Colin and I spied two vehicles that we didn’t recognise, the blue one bore the logo “VELAR”, the sand gold one “Range Rover”. The driver explained that the Velar was a prototype, and the Range Rover was a pre-production test vehicle, both were from Land Rover in Solihull, and the code name for the project was VELAR, which stood for Vee Eight LAnd Rover. After our ride around the track, I said to Colin “One day I’m going to have one of these”, to which Colin replied “What, on an apprentice’s salary, good luck with that”. Many years later, after my wife passed away, I decided to look for an old Range Rover, and bought one from an well known on-line auction site for £1250. About £1000 worth of welding later, I had a fun, stylish classic, which was also my daily driver. About 10 years later, after a blown head gasket, I was forced to part with it, but after my finances were once again stabilised, I found another, this time the car I should have bought first time round, a 1994 LSE Soft Dash. It only cost me £3500, and after a good deal of mechanical fettling, it is now my “For Ever” car.